A Legion of Devils

A review of Karen Stokes, A Legion of Devils: Sherman in South Carolina (Shotwell Press, 2017).

Many of us have read about the horrendous things William Tecumseh Sherman did as he and his “bummers” marched through Georgia, things a lot of us would rather not have read about. However, if we are to properly understand our history we are often compelled to read material that is not necessarily “fun” reading, but is rather necessary reading so that we will have a fuller understanding of what really happened and why.

Such a book is Karen Stokes’ A Legion of Devils–Sherman in South Carolina, published by Shotwell Publishing in Columbia, South Carolina. Shotwell has published some very informative books on Southern history that more people need to be aware of and to read, so that we can begin to learn the history most of us were denied in government schools when we attended them.

Karen Stokes has written several books, but this may be one of the most important. It is a narrative, with many contemporary quotes, from people who were on the scene when Sherman invaded South Carolina toward the end of the War of Northern Aggression. If you think what he did in Georgia was bad, as the man says, “You ain’t seen nothin’ yet.” Yet we hardly ever read anything about what he did in (and to) South Carolina. Somehow his incendiary activities there and the base behavior of this troops there never seem to make it into the history books. South Carolina suffered every bit as much as Georgia did under Sherman’s benevolent hand.

Many instances of brutal treatment of civilians in South Carolina when Sherman passed through are recorded in Stokes’ book, including one where Yankee soldiers attempted to set fire to a bed with an old lady still in it. Such instances are too numerous for me to mention them all here, but I will list a few so you can get a general feeling for Sherman’s accomplishments in the Palmetto State.

The naive among us actually still believe that generals like Sherman, Sheridan, and Grant fought the war to free slaves from Southern bondage. Those on the ground there knew better. In the introduction to the book, on page viii, it is noted: “…the federal soldiers frequently mistreated them (the slaves)). A newspaper correspondent for the New York Tribune reported in its issue of December 7, 1861, that ‘one enterprising and unscrupulous (Federal) officer was caught in the act of assembling a cargo of Negroes for transportation and sale in Cuba…a Northern female physician who worked for the Freedmen’s Aid Society noted in her diary how disgracefully the black people of the Beaufort area were treated by the federal soldiers. She observed that “no colored woman was safe from the brutal lusts of the soldiers’, and that they were not punished for their offenses.”

When the city of Columbia was occupied by Sherman, the mayor and other municipal officers went to Sherman’s headquarters and officially surrendered the city and they received from Sherman the assurance that the city would be as safe as it would have been under the mayor’s administration. Suffice it to say, that was a bald-faced lie. The city was burned and Stokes goes into quite a bit of detail about how that was accomplished, again, quoting from people who were there and saw what happened. The sources for what she wrote were all primary sources.

She noted the comments of a Mrs. S. A. Crittenden of Greenville, South Carolina,  who said: “Oh! The utter desolation of a city in ashes and its people wanderers!  Even the very landmarks were lost, and you stood a stranger on your own threshold. Nothing was left but the smokeless chimneys, keeping ward over the widespread ruin. Hundreds of Yankees with ramrods and bayonets, were prodding the still smoking soil in quest of buried treasure.” And let us not kid ourselves–the Yankee soldiers, from officers on down, stole everything that was not nailed down–and what was nailed down they destroyed if they couldn’t pry it up! This was as much a grand looting expedition was it was an invasion!

And then they tried to blame the fires that destroyed the city of Wade Hampton’s retreating Confederate cavalry. On pages 40-44, Stokes provides General Hampton’s own statements about what really happened. On pages 54-56 are the comments of one Yankee soldier who disagreed with what his comrades were doing, and he pretty well laid out what they were doing. He noted: “…drunken soldiers rushing from house to house,emptying them of valuables and then firing them..Officers and men reveling on wines and liquors until the burning houses buried them in their drunken orgies.” So much for “preserving the Union and freeing the slaves!”

Stokes gave us the commentary of an August Conrad, a native of Germany, who had come to South Carolina in 1859 and had taken over his brother’s position as the Hanoverian Counsel.  He had thought it would be safer in Columbia that in Charleston, so he went to Columbia. Big mistake! He published a memoir later, when he was back (safely) in Germany, about his time in South Carolina that dealt with the burning of Columbia. It was translated into English y William H. Pleasants and published as The Destruction of Columbia, S.C. in 1879. In it he observed: “In the houses, on the streets, the infamous rabble plundered, destroyed, and raged as the Wild Hunt, just as if hell had broken loose.” Hell had broken loose–Sherman was in South Carolina with his Legion of Devils, and doing the devil’s work!

One of those Stokes quoted said: “The fall of Columbia stands quite unique in the history of the American war, but it was sufficient to sully the principle, the conduct, and the results of it, and must for many generations entail the hate of the South Carolinians toward their Northern brethren, who brought upon their forefathers such atrocious treatment.”

Starting on page 111, Stokes gives a timeline covering Sherman’s gentle ministrations in South Carolina, from the time he landed in Beaufort until the time he crossed the North Carolina border. Suffice it to say that it was much more of the same treatment that Columbia got, and his men were particularly vicious when it came to churches.

I have often wondered if Sherman had a touch of pyromania in his makeup, as his men burned everything they came across, no matter what or where it was. I can see destroying military objectives, that’s a part of war, but Sherman destroyed it all. He made war on civilians with more gusto than he made war on Confederate troops. Of course the civilians couldn’t fight back and so that made it easier.

When you look at the makeup of Sherman’s army, you have to wonder just how many ‘Forty-Eighter” socialists he had with him that reveled in the destruction of private property.

If you are going to have some idea of what the War of Northern Aggression was really all about, you need to read Stokes’ book, and Shotwell has done yeoman duty in putting it out there for you, because I don’t think you will get this kind of documentation much of anyplace else today given our politically correct environment.

A Handbook for Ranch Managers Planned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference Manual Environmental & Natural Resource Economics: The Austrian View Combat Shooter's Handbook Reconnaissance Marine MCI 03.32f: Marine Corps Institute The Betrayed: On Warriors, Cowboys and Other Misfits

The Essence of Liberty: Volume I: Liberty and History: The Rise and Fall of the Noble Experiment with Constitutionally Limited Government (Liberty and ... Limited Government) (Volume 1) The Essence of Liberty: Volume II: The Economics of Liberty (Volume 2) The Essence of Liberty: Volume III: A Universal Philosophy of Political Economy (Liberty: A Universal Political Ethic) (Volume 3)  

Check out our WebSite

Check out our e-Store

Reconnaissance Marine MCI 03.32f: Marine Corps InstituteAll unclassified Army and Marine Cops manuals and correspondence courses are products of the US Federal Government. They are NOT subject to copyright and can be freely copied and redistributed.

The Marine Corps Institute (MCI) develops correspondence courses for Marines with all kinds of Military Occupational Specialties (MOS) on all manner of subjects. This is one of those courses.

The print is relatively small because that is the way it was in the original and this is an exact reproduction. Also, as a tribute to the individual (and a touch of reality), you will notice that the editorial pencil marks and underlined passages that were put there by the Marine that took this course. They were intentionally left in the reproduction.

This version of the course was authorized in September of 1984. With the exception the development of Infrared technology, it contains information and techniques that have changed very little since the Vietnam war. These battle proven tactics are as valid today as they were in Quang Nam province in 1968.

They will maintain their validity during the upcoming inevitable event of total economic, political and social collapse. Yours for freedom in our lifetimes. jtl, 419

Advertisements

About Land & Livestock Interntional, Inc.

Land and Livestock International, Inc. is a leading agribusiness management firm providing a complete line of services to the range livestock industry. We believe that private property is the foundation of America. Private property and free markets go hand in hand—without property there is no freedom. We also believe that free markets, not government intervention, hold the key to natural resource conservation and environmental preservation. No government bureaucrat can (or will) understand and treat the land with as much respect as its owner. The bureaucrat simply does not have the same motives as does the owner of a capital interest in the property. Our specialty is the working livestock ranch simply because there are so many very good reasons for owning such a property. We provide educational, management and consulting services with a focus on ecologically and financially sustainable land management that will enhance natural processes (water and mineral cycles, energy flow and community dynamics) while enhancing profits and steadily building wealth.
This entry was posted in History, War of Yankee Aggression and tagged , . Bookmark the permalink.

1 Response to A Legion of Devils

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s