Getting Libertarianism Right

How does this bring in the difference between the Left and the Right? Hans takes the fundamental difference between these two worldviews to be simple. The Right accepts the reality of human differences but the Left does not. Because Leftists try to make everyone equal, they favor massive interventions by the State to abolish human differences.

And their “making” everyone equal requires violence or force (the threat of violence). Think about it. It would be impossible for any kind of government to exist without force or violence.

In fact, the origin of government is proof. So whose idea was it–this thing called “government?”

Jimmy T’s short answer: Actually it occurred before recorded human history — when the strong tribe invaded the weak tribe, killed them all and took their shit. Then, being endowed by their creator with the ability to reason, they quickly figured out that, if they did not kill them all, but instead reduced them to some level of servitude, then in the long run, they could get more shit. — jtl, 419
By Llewellyn H. Rockwell, Jr. at LewRockwell.com

Getting Libertarianism Right. By Hans-Hermann Hoppe. Mises Institute, 2018. 126 pages. Introduction by Sean Gabb.

The title of Hans Hoppe’s wonderful new book has a double meaning. We need to get libertarianism right—to understand libertarianism correctly. How can we do this? By realizing that if we want a libertarian society, we need to embrace the values of the Right.

Why is that true? Isn’t libertarianism just a commitment to rules for peaceful relations among people? Hans says: “Knowing libertarian theory — the rules of peaceful interactions — is like knowing the rules of logic — the rules of correct thinking and reasoning. . . just as every logician who wants to make good use of his knowledge must turn his attention to real thought and reasoning, so a libertarian theorist must turn his attention to the actions of real people. Instead of being a mere theorist, he must also become a sociologist and psychologist and take account of ’empirical’ social reality, i.e., the world as it really is.”

How does this bring in the difference between the Left and the Right? Hans takes the fundamental difference between these two worldviews to be simple. The Right accepts the reality of human differences but the Left does not. Because Leftists try to make everyone equal, they favor massive interventions by the State to abolish human differences.

Hans demolishes the Leftist view with mordant sarcasm:  “The egalitarian worldview of the Left is not only incompatible with libertarianism, however. It is so out of touch with reality that one must be wondering how anyone can take it seriously. The man-on-the-street certainly does not believe in the equality of all men. Plain common sense and sound prejudice stand in the way of that. And I am even more confident that no one of the actual proponents of the egalitarian doctrine really, deep down, believes what he proclaims. Yet how, then, could the Leftist worldview have become the dominant ideology of our age? At least for a libertarian, the answer should be obvious: the egalitarian doctrine achieved this status not because it is true, but because it provides the perfect intellectual cover for the drive toward totalitarian social control by a ruling elite”

Unfortunately, so-called “left libertarians” don’t get the point. They are “misfits,” Hans says, who share the Left’s commitment to forced equality. But don’t they have a problem? How can they say they are libertarians if the free market leads to inequality? They resort to a trick. They emphasize, correctly, that today’s titles to property can’t be traced back to a first act of appropriation that has been passed on to the current property owner. Aggression by the state has distorted things: ”They point to the fact that all current private property holdings and their distribution among various people have been affected, altered, and distorted by prior State action and legislation and that everything would be different and no one would be in the same place and position he currently is had it not been for such prior State-interferences. Without any doubt, this observation is correct.”

The left libertarians draw the wrong conclusion from this observation. As Murray Rothbard pointed out, if you challenge a current property title, you have the burden of proof to show that you are the rightful owner.  If you can’t do it, the current owner doesn’t have to do anything. Certainly, he doesn’t have surrender his property to satisfy the latest fashionable group of “victims” that the Leftist bleeding hearts champion.

Hans’s response to the Left is magnificent in its un-PC character: “Why not the ‘victims’ giving special respect to their ‘victimizers’? Why not bestow special honor to economic achievement and success instead of failure, and why not give special praise to traditional, ‘normal’ lifestyles and conduct rather than any abnormal alternative that requires, as a necessary condition of its own continued existence, a pre-existing dominant surrounding society of ‘normal’ people with ‘normal’ lifestyles?”

Because “left libertarians” do not recognize human differences, they embrace a suicidal ‘open borders’ policy that would destroy Western culture. “A million more Nigerians or Arabs living in Germany or a million more Mexicans or Hutus or Tutsis residing in the US is quite a different thing than a million more home-grown Germans or Americans. With millions of third- and second-world immigrants present when the crisis hits and the paychecks stop coming in, it is highly unlikely that a peaceful outcome will result and a natural, private-property-based social order emerge”

As you read the book, you will soon discover that Hans is also a master historian. The “original sin”, as he calls it, was to establish a supreme judicial authority to resolve legal disputes. “Predictably, the monopolist will use his position as ultimate decision-maker not only to resolve conflict between contending property owners, but increasingly also to initiate or provoke conflicts with private property owners, in order to then decide such conflicts in his own favor, i.e., to expropriate the just property of others to his own advantage on the basis of his own made-up laws. And on the other hand, the price to be paid for justice will rise. In fact, the price of justice will not simply be a ‘higher price’ that justice seekers may or may not be willing to pay (as would be the case for any other monopoly), but a tax that justice seekers must pay whether they agree to it or not.”

He defies the conventional wisdom that sees the rise of mass democracy as way to control the State. Exactly the reverse is true: “Only with democracy, however, i.e., the free and unrestricted entry into the State, are all moral restraints and inhibitions against the taking of others’ lawful property removed. Everyone is free to indulge in such temptations and propose and promote every conceivable measure of legislation and taxation to gain advantages at other people’s expense. That is, whereas in a natural order everyone is expected to spend his time exclusively on production or consumption, under democratic conditions, increasingly more time is spent instead on politics, i.e., on the advocacy and promotion of activities that are neither productive nor consumptive, but exploitative and parasitic of and on the property of others.”

Against the State: An … Llewellyn H. Rockwell Jr. Best Price: $5.00 Buy New $9.21 (as of 09:55 EDT – Details) Democratic politicians know that they will be in power for only a fairly short time, so they will grab what they can. Why should they care about the future of society? “Moreover, owing to regularly recurring elections, the politicization of society never comes to an end but is constantly reignited and continued. Legal uncertainty or lawlessness is thus heightened and social time preferences will rise still further, i.e., increasingly shortening the time horizon taken into consideration in one’s action-plans. And in the process of political competition, i.e., in the competition for the position of ultimate decision-maker, such politicians and political parties will rise to the top who have the least moral scruples and the best skills as demagogues, i.e., of proposing and propagating the most popular assortment of immoral and unlawful demands from a near limitless supply of such demands on offer in public opinion”

When you read this book, you will come away with one unmistakable impression. Hans doesn’t mince words. He says, for example, “If measured by the standards of natural law and justice, all politicians, of all parties and virtually without any exception, are guilty, whether directly or indirectly, of murder, homicide, trespass, invasion, expropriation, theft, fraud, and the fencing of stolen goods on a massive and ongoing scale. And every new generation of politicians and parties appears to be worse, and piles even more atrocities and perversions on top of the already existing mountain, so that one feels almost nostalgic about the past. They all should be hung, or put in jail to rot, or set to making compensation.”

Hans warns us against intellectuals who pander to the State. “Because there is only little and fickle market demand for words rather than things, intellectuals are always desperate for any help they can get to stay afloat, and the State, in permanent need of ideological support for its relentless onslaught against natural law and justice, is only too willing to offer such help and employ them as public educators in exchange for the appropriate propaganda.” Hans could have had a stellar academic career had he joined this group of phony intellectuals, but he wouldn’t compromise.

Hans learned his refusal to compromise from his mentor in politics and economics, Murray Rothbard. He concludes the book with an essay on what he learned from Murray. Among the most important of these lessons was this: “But above all it was Murray who taught me never to trust official history, invariably written by the victors, but to conduct all historical research instead like a detective investigating a crime. Always, first and foremost and as a first approximation, follow the money in search of a motive.”

I remember how happy Murray was when in the early 1980s he met this brilliant young scholar. In the years since then, Hans Hoppe has become our foremost libertarian social theorist. Readers of this penetrating and forthright book will see for themselves why Murray was so enthusiastic about Hans Hoppe.

The Best of Llewellyn H. Rockwell, Jr.

The philosophy of the author (as well as the publisher) is that ranch management should be approached from the view that the land, the livestock, the people and the money are one—a single integrated whole. But once that is understood and constantly kept in mind, a close examination of each of these elements is permissible. Furthermore, due to the linear limitations of the written word, each of these management areas has to be treated separately. In keeping with that, Part I deals with the management of the natural resources. Part II covers livestock production and Part III deals with the people and the money. The book is a comprehensive source of information on all aspects of managing the working ranch. Not only would it make an excellent basic text for a university program in Ranch Management, no professional ranch manager’s reference bookshelf should be without it because it is a comprehensive reference manual for managing the working ranch. The information in the appendices alone is worth the price of the book. Read More. 

Planned Grazing: A Study Guide and Reference ManualFrom the Editor: I first attended Alan Savory and Stan Parson’s “Rancher School” in Albuquerque, NM in the early 1980s. Since that time, and throughout my academic career, I have advocated, taught and practiced the principles of the “Savory Grazing Method (or SGM)” as it was called in those days. Only a short time after I completed the school, Alan and Stan decided to dissolve their partnership and go their separate ways. Alan founded Holistic Management International and Stan the Ranching for Profit School. SGM (now Holistic Management) is a “method” and “methods” cannot be patented. As a result, the names the principles are presented under have proliferated. Although the fundamental ecological principles have not changed since those early days, we now have managed grazing, planned grazing, mob grazing, management intensive grazing, and perhaps a half-dozen others. (In fact, for some small degree of distinction, we choose to call what we do “Managing the Ranch…Read More

Environmental & Natural Resource Economics: The Austrian ViewMurray N. Rothbard was the father of what some call Radical Libertarianism or Anarcho-Capitalism which Hans-Hermann Hoppe described as “Rothbard’s unique contribution to the rediscovery of property and property rights as the common foundation of both economics and political philosophy, and the systematic reconstruction and conceptual integration of modern, marginalist economics and natural-law political philosophy into a unified moral science: libertarianism.” This book applies the principles of this “unified moral science” to environmental and natural resource management issues. The book started out life as an assigned reading list for a university level course entitled Environmental…Read More

The Betrayed: On Warriors, Cowboys and Other MisfitsSometimes people do the wrong things for the right reasons. The author admits that to be the “story of his life” and openly shares much of it in this book. Although the book is largely an historically based auto-biography, it is part fact and part fiction. In cases where identities needed to be protected, the “facts” necessary to that end are changed but without altering the accuracy of the description of the event or its historical significance. It is a personal story. It is a cowboy-warrior’s story told in a cowboy-warrior’s language. It is the story of one man’s journey from bondage to freedom and from slavery to liberty. It is the gritty story of this man’s life-long education in the school of hard knocks as his journey took him from a sharecropper’s shack, through the rodeo arena and the boxing ring, across the football field and the drilling rig floor, into the Marines and two wars and ultimately culminating in the university… Read More 

Combat Shooter's Handbook“Owning a handgun doesn’t make you armed any more than owning a guitar makes you a musician.” – Jeff Cooper Call for a pizza, a cop, and an ambulance and see which one arrives first. In Warren v. District of Columbia the court ruled, and the Supreme Court upheld, that “(T)he desire for condemnation cannot satisfy the need for a special relationship out of which a duty to specify persons arises.” Because the complaint did not allege a relationship “beyond that found in general police responses to crimes,” the court affirmed the dismissal of the complaint for failure to state a claim. The bottom line is that your local police are not legally obligated to protect you, the average citizen. In addition to the Warren case, there are hundreds of court rulings which state that cops are not legally responsible for protecting individual citizens. For example, see Zelig v. County of Los Angeles, The government can’t protect you as you saw on September 11, 2001 as well as during the Washington, DC… Read More

Reconnaissance Marine MCI 03.32f: Marine Corps InstituteAll unclassified Army and Marine Cops manuals and correspondence courses are products of the US Federal Government. They are NOT subject to copyright and can be freely copied and redistributed. The Marine Corps Institute (MCI) develops correspondence courses for Marines with all kinds of Military Occupational Specialties (MOS) on all manner of subjects. This is one of those courses. The print is relatively small because that is the way it was in the original and this is an exact reproduction. Also, as a tribute to the individual (and a touch of reality), you will notice that the editorial pencil marks and underlined passages that were put there by the Marine that took this course. They were intentionally left in the reproduction. This version of the course was authorized in September of 1984. With the exception the development of Infrared technology, it contains information and techniques that have changed very little since the Vietnam war. These battle proven tactics are as valid today as they were… Read More

The Essence of Liberty: Volume I: Liberty and History: The Rise and Fall of the Noble Experiment with Constitutionally Limited Government (Liberty and ... Limited Government) (Volume 1)The Essence of Liberty: Volume I: Liberty and History: The Rise and Fall of the Noble Experiment with Constitutionally Limited Government. Jimmy T LaBaume, editor.  Read More 

The Essence of Liberty: Volume II: The Economics of Liberty (Volume 2)The Essence of Liberty: Volume II: The Economics of Liberty (Volume 2) Read More

The Essence of Liberty: Volume III: A Universal Philosophy of Political Economy (Liberty: A Universal Political Ethic) (Volume 3) by Dr Jimmy T (Gunny) LaBaume (2014-04-01)The Essence of Liberty: Volume III: A Universal Philosophy of Political Economy (Liberty: A Universal Political Ethic) (Volume 3) Read More

About Land & Livestock Interntional, Inc.

Land and Livestock International, Inc. is a leading agribusiness management firm providing a complete line of services to the range livestock industry. We believe that private property is the foundation of America. Private property and free markets go hand in hand—without property there is no freedom. We also believe that free markets, not government intervention, hold the key to natural resource conservation and environmental preservation. No government bureaucrat can (or will) understand and treat the land with as much respect as its owner. The bureaucrat simply does not have the same motives as does the owner of a capital interest in the property. Our specialty is the working livestock ranch simply because there are so many very good reasons for owning such a property. We provide educational, management and consulting services with a focus on ecologically and financially sustainable land management that will enhance natural processes (water and mineral cycles, energy flow and community dynamics) while enhancing profits and steadily building wealth.
This entry was posted in Libertarianism, Uncategorized and tagged , . Bookmark the permalink.

1 Response to Getting Libertarianism Right

  1. Reblogged this on Land & Livestock International, Inc. and commented:

    And their “making” everyone equal requires violence or force (the threat of violence). Think about it. It would be impossible for any kind of government to exist without force or violence.

    In fact, the origin of government is proof. So whose idea was it–this thing called “government?”

    Jimmy T’s short answer: Actually it occurred before recorded human history — when the strong tribe invaded the weak tribe, killed them all and took their shit. Then, being endowed by their creator with the ability to reason, they quickly figured out that, if they did not kill them all, but instead reduced them to some level of servitude, then in the long run, they could get more shit. — jtl, 419

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s